Peoples of the North Saskatchewan Festival a Great Success

Posted on May 31, 2018

 

Registration for the 2019/2020 History Centre programs will be opening on June 3rd, 2019!

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We are happy to report that the “People of the North Saskatchewan Festival” on May 15th and 16th, 2018 was a resounding success. The Festival, which is put on annually by the Fort Saskatchewan Historical Society, is a free event run primarily by volunteers that showcases Fort Saskatchewan’s history and the stories of the people who built our community more than 100 years ago.

Fort Heritage Precinct staff were thrilled to participate in the Festival as costumed interpreters and were privileged to inform and entertain over 600 eager students each day who visited from many schools in the area.

The Historical Society’s “First Aid Station,” where students got treated for imaginary broken limbs and assorted fractures, was an definite hit. Among a huge variety of exciting demonstrations and activities, students also had the opportunity to learn to churn butter, try homemade bannock, enjoy a horse-drawn wagon ride, and explore the 1875 North West Mounted Police Fort. Students were delighted by the eight different costumed interpreters located throughout the Fort, including interpreters dressed as officers’ wives, enlisted men, a métis cleaner, and Inspector William Jarvis, the Commanding Officer of the original fort in 1875.

Thank you to the Fort Saskatchewan Historic Society for putting on this incredible event! We are already looking forward to next year’s festival!

"The tour of the Precinct was really interesting and very engaging for the children. There were so many hands on activities for them to participate in that they were always engaged. I love that they are allowed to touch and explore many of the items around the precinct. That makes such a difference to keep them engaged, on task and motivated. The learning connections between what we talked about in school and what we saw were evident in the conversations between the kids and the interpreters."